Where are you in the journey?

Whether you’re exporting products, services or experiences, discover the next step for your business. Click the timeline below to locate where you are now, and see what you might want to do next. 

 

 

Am I ready to export?

You may be exporting already. Join Canadian businesses of all sizes that are finding success by growing their customer base and finding new opportunities internationally.

Quick tips 

  • Between 2009 and 2011, one out of every 10 exporters grew at an annual rate of more than 20%. 

  • You don't have to be a huge corporation—size isn’t related to success abroad. 

  • Understand that you’ll require thorough preparation and logistical planning. 

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

bdc*: Step 2—Prepare a winning business plan

Discover our articles, tips and free resources designed to help you put together a solid business plan.

EDC Export Help Hub

Insights to guide smart export decisions.

FITT: Situational analysis

Learn how to accurately assess your company’s current ability to grow internationally and conduct the right research, efficiently and cost effectively. This workshop will help you determine whether you’re ready to expand, and which markets will work best for you.

 

 

Build an export plan

Your export plan is an extension of your business plan. Discover how to map a strategy to find new customers and partners internationally, be competitive and access the skilled talent you need to grow your business.

Quick tips 

  • Ensure your domestic business plan is already effective. 

  • Cover elements such as financing arrangements, major competitors and market risks. 

  • Consider staffing plans, competitive advantages and disadvantages and how you might need to adapt your product. 

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

FITT: Products & Services for a Global Market

Give yourself an edge over your competition by adapting your products and services to local regulatory, cultural, pricing and packaging requirements for sale in international markets.

FITT: Planning for International Market Entry

The organizations that succeed in new international trade ventures are usually those that carefully plan their market entry strategies. By choosing the right market entry strategy for your industry and needs, analyzing market entry opportunities, and creating a new international business plan, you will be able to play to your strengths better than ever and establish the best possible strategy for your short-term and long-term future.

Canada Border Services Agency: Free and Secure Trade

The Free and Secure Trade (FAST) program is a commercial clearance program designed to ensure safety and security while expediting legitimate trade across the Canada–U.S. border.

 

 

Identify target markets

Conduct market research to pinpoint the best country for your business by identifying opportunities, highlighting trade barriers and understanding where your product or service is in demand.

Quick tips 

  • Do you offer something niche to a specific market?

  • Identify which countries have a Free Trade Agreement with Canada and focus on them first. 

  • Figure out how you will get your product to that market and what it will cost you. 

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

FITT: Feasibility of International Trade

Decide whether new international trade opportunities are viable, assess your company’s readiness to take advantage of them and determine whether the potential benefits outweigh the risks and costs.

Goverment of Canada: Business and industry

Information for businesses on tax and tariff requirements, permits and regulations, intellectual property and copyright, and how to fund or incorporate a business, hire employees or sell to government.

Google: Export Business Map

Make the web work for Canadian exporters.

 

 

Finding customers

Consult with government agencies, trade associations, subject matter experts, brokers and other exporters to help you determine what your international customer’s needs.

Quick tips 

  • Partner with like-minded businesses to expand your network. 

  • Open a foreign affiliate to sell goods and services. 

  • Attend trade shows and conferences specific to your industry. 

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

Goverment of Canada: Business and industry

Information for businesses on tax and tariff requirements, permits and regulations, intellectual property and copyright, and how to fund or incorporate a business, hire employees or sell to government.

Global Affairs Canada: Foreign representatives in Canada

The Office of Protocol helps you find the most accurate information on foreign missions and international organizations accredited to Canada, and on their staff members.

FITT: Selling to international markets

When you communicate clearly with your customers, negotiate or conduct your transactions clearly and provide the service they want, they’ll keep coming back again and again. Set up the right sales channels to give your customers access to your products or services, discover whether using agents, wholesalers or retailers should be part of your strategy, and find how acting upon customer information you’ve gathered can lead to increases in satisfaction rates.

 

 

Entering target markets

Finding your place in a new market is about selecting the best timing and the right partners. Determine the best market-entry options for your business. Should you sell directly, use a distribution network or set up an international office?

Quick tips 

  • If thinking about exporting directly to foreign consumers, consider how you might have to adapt your product.

  • Intermediaries can help with cultural differences and language barriers. 

  • Partnering with a local company can help you with on-the-ground knowledge.

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

FITT: Selling to international markets

When you communicate clearly with your customers, negotiate or conduct your transactions clearly and provide the service they want, they’ll keep coming back again and again. Set up the right sales channels to give your customers access to your products or services, discover whether using agents, wholesalers or retailers should be part of your strategy, and find how acting upon customer information you’ve gathered can lead to increases in satisfaction rates.

Global Affairs Canada: Country Insights

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view.

Country Info

EDC’s Country Info page is a country-by-country portal outlining our trade relationships, potential buyers, economic and political trends, as well as sector and commodity information.

 

 

Identify finance requirements

Financial products fuel your international growth. Discover how to find government loans and grants, get financial information on partners, negotiate competitive payment terms with new customers, and why leveraging your accounts receivable and insuring your sales can put you in a more competitive position.

Quick tips 

  • The Government of Canada offers tax incentives, like the SR&ED program

  • Accounts receivable insurance can be used to leverage more working capital from your bank. 

  • Having enough cash flow allows you to take on international contracts as they come your way.

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

Export Guarantee Program

The Export Guarantee Program shares the financial risk with your bank so you can get the financing you need to break into new markets.

FITT: International Trade Finance

In the International Trade Finance course, you’ll learn everything an importer or exporter needs to know about payment, risk mitigation and financing, the financial flow and the flow of goods and services in global trade.

Goverment of Canada: Canada Small Business Financing Program

Most start-ups and existing for-profit small businesses in Canada with gross revenues of $10 million or less are eligible to apply for loans under this program. Such businesses can be corporations, sole proprietors, partnerships or co-operatives.

 

 

Managing risk

Get insights into political, financial, economic and business risk so you can take steps to protect yourself from non-payment and create a robust risk management strategy.

Quick tips 

  • Protect your intellectual property by registering your IP in Canada and in the international market.

  • Ask each new customer to complete a credit application.

  • Protect against non-payment with credit insurance. 

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

FITT: Risk analysis and management

What tolerance does your business have for risks, and are you prepared for them? By using standard tools and strategies, you can estimate the likelihood of different types of risk and prepare contingency plans for dealing with them. With these in hand, even if risk becomes reality, you’ll be able to reduce its impact on your business and maintain a trajectory towards long-term stability and success. 

Foreign Exchange Facility Guarantee

Foreign exchange risk management is easier with our FOREX Guarantee. Purchase foreign exchange contracts without the need for collateral.

EDC Credit Insurance

EDC Credit Insurance is a type of commercial export insurance that protects your accounts receivable against losses when a customer cannot pay.

 

 

Sustaining growth

Understand how you can build on your exporting success to grow your business through direct investment, establish an in-market presence and develop a solid international network.

Quick tips 

  • Expand your reach online through e-commerce and social media.

  • Make your business environment more innovative.

  • Partner with like-minded companies in international markets.

Learn more

Find answers to your intercultural questions from a Canadian and a local point of view. 

FITT: Global value chain

Manage your company’s supply chain and logistics to mitigate risks, reduce costs and improve efficiency throughout every stage of your global value chain.

Goverment of Canada: Business and industry

Information for businesses on tax and tariff requirements, permits and regulations, intellectual property and copyright, and how to fund or incorporate a business, hire employees or sell to government.

Global Export Forecast Fall 2018

Get expert insight from a top economist on the current trends influencing global trade and Canadian exporting, in a user-friendly, twice-annual report.

Interested in growing your business in this market?

Speak to a Trade Advisor weekdays between 9 am to 5 pm EST.

1-888-220-0047

Or send us a question and we'll get back to you as soon as possible. Send a question

Jose Recinos

Senior Trade Advisor, EDC

Jose Recinos  Senior Trade Advisor, EDC